Richard Diebenkorn Correspondence

Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
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Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
< Scroll left to right >
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
< Scroll left to right >
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
< Scroll left to right >
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn

Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn

Date:
5 July 1945 and 6 July 1945
Medium:
Ink on paper
Credit Line:
© Richard Diebenkorn Foundation
RD number:
RDFA.251
Description
Two letters from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn while the artist was serving in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II, 5 July 1945 and 6 July 1945

Transcription:

July 5th [1945]

Hello Darling,

Two letters again today. Does that mean I go without, tomorrow? I hope not and I hope I don't start receiving three a day like you. If you love me like I love you and you don't receive mail from me for three days I'm surprised you haven't taken to beating Gretchen. I wouldn't if I were you — just in case.

Thank you Sweet for the clipping. And I did squirm, in fact I'm still squirming. About the question you brought up. I think the reviewer is right. These elements, camera distortion, microscopic + celestial photography, etc. are part of 20th century chaos. Visual chaos. And in a visual medium which expresses the 20th century I see a definite place for these elements. It takes a man with vision and imagination like Picasso to put them in their place. This is not the thing which makes him a great artist though. It is the thing that makes him the foremost figure in 20th century art so far. He is the discoverer of the truly appropriate subject matter. His keen mind assimilated these chaotic elements in our time but to my way of thinking this doesn't make the great artist. I think Braque is a greater artist and Klee and Rouault back to Modigliani and Pascin. But enough of shop talk.

Today I went to Fort Shafter and visited Moir who is doing panels for an oil mural for some officer's bar. Two polynesian maidens standing among the great leaves of a banyan tree is the selected subject and he gladly, too eagerly took the afternoon off to talk to me. We had a good time covering a sea of topics generally from art to art. Here is an artist you would like, I know, and one who I wouldn't hestiate to introduce to McDonough.

The lights are going off and I must finish tomorrow morning.


July 6th AM [1945]

Sweet,

I guess I don't have much more to say. I thought I did.

I remember now. It was about the writing I'm going to try to do. I have a good story in mind and I started it yesterday but its so tough. Every two words I write there are problems. I must admit now that writing is difficult but I musn't let the technical aspects defeat me because I think I have something worth putting down.

I want to start in now so I'll talk to you again tonight.

I love you so much, Darling. Give my love to Grett, Mom II and Aunt Daisy. and Chico. and John. I love you again Darling,

Witz

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