Richard Diebenkorn Correspondence

Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
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Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
< Scroll left to right >
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
< Scroll left to right >
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
< Scroll left to right >
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
< Scroll left to right >
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
< Scroll left to right >
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn

Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn

Date:
21 November 1943
Medium:
Ink on paper
Credit Line:
© Richard Diebenkorn Foundation
RD number:
RDFA.259
Description
Correspondence from Richard Diebenkorn to Phyllis Diebenkorn while the artist was serving in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II, 21 November 1943

Transcription:

November 21st [1943]

Good Evening Darling,

I just saw a wonderful movie. "The Sky's the Limit," Fred Astaire and Joan Leslie. I would like you to see it. It was a light, fast moving, love story musical which hit a very sympathetic chord in Witz. Maybe it was just that I hadn't seen a class A movie for some time but I'm just sure that it is good. No new story or anything but just done well. All the gaps were funny and the general presentation was direct and convincing and it put me in a very sentimental mood.

I missed on the mail again tonight and I felt very low. Just lousy low. But the show although it

– 2 –

didn't pick me up much made me beautifully blue. Gee, I miss you, Darling. They've got to give me a furlough. A ten day one. Are you looking forward to it?

I drew today. Gamel knew I had been an art major and he asked me to draw a picture of his girl from a dinky photograph. He wanted it to mail to her. I suggested that I draw his portrait to mail to her. He thought that was a wonderful idea and I made as good a picture of him as I could have made had I been in practise. Everybody thought it was amazing and I became an immediate sensation. It was a pretty fair likeness. Then the tenor in the hut asked me to do his portrait.

– 3 –

I did a splendid one of him, the best I've done. It is really good and I'm sure that I've improved a great deal in my time off. I suspect, if this can happen, that my talent is maturing without practise. My eye seemed much keener and the likeness was exact. Of course I didn't let on that the picture was an unusual product of my talents at all. Darling, there's where I want you to be confident in me. I've just about kissed goodbye to that commission. But don't get the idea that I'm quitting. I'll plug on and if 200 make it I'll be one of them.

Lights off in a few minutes. I think I'll have a

– 4 –

cigarette and finish this tomorrow. The mood I'm in is a very satisfactory one. I'd like to be able to describe it. Good night, Darling.

I love you.
________________________

November 22d

No mail today. None for five days now. I hope you're not sick.

I love you,

Witz

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